Cincinnati-based Last Mile Food Rescue collects leftovers and donates to local nonprofits

Imagine enjoying a nachos at a Reds or Cincinnati FC game. There is a possibility that the guests did not buy the last loaded snack at the food stand. So what happens to all that leftover lettuce, tomato, and onion when it’s game over? A new nonprofit in the greater Cincinnati area called Last Mile Food Rescue aims to prevent all food waste from ending up in landfills. “In Cincinnati, food waste can currently wrap around the loop of I-275 twice. So we’re working on making a dent, ”said LMFR dispatcher Benita Munnerlyn. The Last Mile Food Rescue began in November with a goal of eliminating food insecurity and promoting a healthier environment in the area. Freestore Foodbank reports that food insecurity affects more than 270,000 households in the greater Cincinnati area. LMFR collects leftover and unused food and delivers it directly to more than 100 local nonprofits. “Children are not going to study on an empty stomach and parents are not going to go to work on an empty stomach,” said Paul Verhagen, last mile volunteer with other volunteers to donor partners such as Great American Ball Park, Delaware North, TQL Stadium, Kroger and United Dairy Farmers drive to collect leftover meat and products. Instead of bringing groceries back to the last mile, volunteers bring the groceries straight to nonprofits like emergency shelters and halfway homes. Pick-ups are called “rescue”. Volunteers use a free app to coordinate rescue operations and companies use Last Mile technology to track their donations. “You know, some days I’ll do one,” said Verhagen of his voluntary rescue operations. “I only did four in one day last week. And it’s great fun. I mean, meeting people and serving the community, which I really think is the most important thing here.” Last Mile Food Rescue said more than 600,000 pounds of food have been saved since early November. LMFR said its goal is to save a million pounds by the end of 2021. More than £ 500,000 have been saved so far. The nonprofit is currently looking for more drivers and more partners for food supplies to be received by your organization or to be delivered to a nonprofit, click here.

Imagine enjoying a nachos at a Reds or Cincinnati FC game.

There is a possibility that the guests did not buy the last loaded snack at the food stand. So what happens to all that leftover lettuce, tomato, and onion when it’s game over?

A new nonprofit in the greater Cincinnati area called Last Mile Food Rescue aims to prevent all food waste from ending up in landfills.

“In Cincinnati, food waste can currently wrap around the I-275 loop twice. So we’re working on making a dent, ”said LMFR dispatcher Benita Munnerlyn.

Last Mile Food Rescue began in November with the aim of eliminating food insecurity and promoting a healthier environment in the area. Freestore Foodbank reports that food insecurity affects more than 270,000 households in the greater Cincinnati area. LMFR collects leftover and unused food and delivers it directly to more than 100 local nonprofits.

“Children will not study on an empty stomach and parents will not go to work on an empty stomach,” said Paul Verhagen, last mile volunteer.

Verhagen and other volunteers travel to donor partners such as Great American Ball Park, Delaware North, TQL Stadium, Kroger and United Dairy Farmers to collect scraps of meat and products. Instead of bringing groceries back to the last mile, volunteers bring the groceries straight to nonprofits like emergency shelters and halfway homes. Pick-ups are called “rescue”.

Verhagen started volunteering in March and has already participated in 50 rescue operations. Volunteers use a free app to coordinate rescue operations and companies use Last Mile technology to track their donations.

“You know, some days I do one,” said Verhagen of his voluntary rescue operations. “I only did four in one day last week. And it’s great fun. I mean, meeting people and serving the community, which is really the most important thing here.”

Last Mile Food Rescue said more than 600,000 pounds of food have been saved since early November. LMFR said its goal is to save a million pounds by the end of 2021. More than £ 500,000 have been saved so far.

The non-profit organization is currently looking for more drivers and partners to provide food.

Click here to join the effort and see if your organization will pick up groceries or deliver them to a non-profit organization.

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