Cincinnati doctors are warning of an increase in COVID-19 in children and young adults now more than ever

There is an alarming tone from doctors in Ohio and Kentucky about the continued surge in the Delta variant. Andy Beshear said today it “continues to burn in Kentucky at a rate we’ve never seen before.” At the Ohio Department of Health, Dr described before vaccines even existed. “Case numbers are rising along with critical staff shortages. 62 of the 96 hospitals Kentucky is on the verge of shortages. The state is ordering 40 additional ventilators from national supplies and preparing for possible oxygen starvation. Beshear says hospitals don’t have enough monitors to do basic things like reading vital signs Reading a patient’s mandates, Beshear expects a special session of the legislature soon, perhaps next Tuesday. ” You know, if you’re a red county, okay, the state can come in and do something because it means it’s out of control, ”Beshear told reporters during his Team Kentucky briefing Thursday Nursing homes were appealing to state lawmakers to interfere in the fight against the spread of the variant. Doctors continued pounding home what they believed was the only two-part answer: vaccinations and wearing universal masks. They warned of one at risk Safety net for children as hospitals are exposed to a burnout factor. “People are simply exhausted,” observed Dr. Hector Wong, the head of the intensive care unit at the children’s hospital’s medical center Leaving Healthcare. “Wong has over 30 years of critical care experience. He has been in the past Experienced a dramatic increase in COVID-19 children n weeks. “It feels different now,” he told us. “A year ago we had a handful of children in the hospital who were with us for other illnesses and happened to have COVID. Now we see children in the hospital, including the intensive care unit, who are there because” of COVID. “In terms of patients admitted to hospital, intensive care and ventilators, Kentucky is ending the worst week of the entire pandemic and the death toll is rising.” Today’s report will include a 27-year-old, “Beshear said.” That affects younger people. It makes people sicker than we’ve ever seen. “Thirty bluegrass school districts have been on hiatus due to outbreaks. According to this Team Kentucky chart, there were just under 12% of COVID-19 cases of 18 and younger in August last year This August the percentage is double. In a pre-recorded message, pediatrician Beth Brooks shared her experience. “At the start of the pandemic, we saw children not getting as sick. But for now, they are becoming you as sick as adults. They end up in the same intensive care unit. They are on vents, “she said. Doctors in Ohio and Kentucky said it was important to have more vaccinations and more masks. Together with immunocompromised patients, they see the young and the healthy. Dr. Brian Taylor, a medical director for several Columbus hospitals, summed it up by saying, “We have a lot of people between 20 and 30 and 40 who are on oxygen or even in intensive care and have no history of medical problems. ”

There is an alarming tone from doctors in Ohio and Kentucky about the continued surge in the Delta variant.

Governor Andy Beshear said today that “Kentucky continues to burn at a rate we have never seen before.”

At the Ohio Department of Health, Dr. Bruce Vanderhoff described this as “very worrying” and “very reminiscent of our winter surge before vaccines were even available”.

The number of cases increases along with the critical staff shortage. 62 of the 96 hospitals in Kentucky are on the verge of shortages. The state is requesting 40 additional ventilators from the national supply and preparing for a possible lack of oxygen.

Beshear says hospitals don’t have enough monitors for basic things like reading a patient’s vital signs.

Beshear says there must be something about mask mandates and expects a special session of the legislature soon, perhaps next Tuesday.

“Whether that’s the power to do it when you need to, or the power to do it in high-speed areas. Right, they might want to see, you know, if you’re a red county, okay, the state can step in and do something because it means it’s getting out of hand, ”Beshear told reporters during his briefing on Team Kentucky Thursday .

The heads of hospitals and nursing homes appealed to the state legislators to get involved in the fight against the spread of the variant.

Both states had headaches on Thursday about how to keep kids in school this fall and winter. Doctors kept pounding home, which they thought was the only two-part answer: vaccinations and universal mask wear.

They warned of a pediatric safety net at risk as hospitals face a burnout factor.

“People are just exhausted,” noted Dr. Hector Wong, the head of the intensive care unit at the Children’s Hospital Medical Center. “Emotionally drained and many have decided to leave the healthcare workforce.”

Wong has over 30 years of critical care experience. He has seen a dramatic increase in the number of COVID-19 children in the past few weeks.

“It feels different now,” he told us. “A year ago we had a handful of children in the hospital who were with us for other illnesses who happened to have COVID. Now we see children in the hospital, including the intensive care unit, who are there because ‘of COVID.”

In terms of hospitalized, ICU, and ventilated patients, Kentucky has had its worst week in the entire pandemic, and the death toll is rising.

“Today’s report will include a 27-year-old,” said Beshear. “It hits younger people. It makes people sicker than we’ve ever seen.”

Thirty school districts in bluegrass have been sidelined due to outbreaks.

According to this Team Kentucky table, last August there were just under 12% of COVID-19 cases that involved people 18 and younger. In August there are twice as many.

In a recorded message, pediatrician Beth Brooks shared her experience.

“At the beginning of the pandemic, we saw that children didn’t get that sick. But right now they’re getting just as sick as adults. You end up in the same intensive care unit. She said.

Doctors in Ohio and Kentucky said it was important to have more vaccinations and more masks. Together with immunocompromised patients, they see the young and the healthy.

Dr. Brian Taylor, a medical director for several Columbus hospitals, summed it up by saying, “We have a lot of people in their 20s, 30s and 40s who are on oxygen or even in intensive care and have no medical history issues.”

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